Drawing from the past to move forward

Nov 25, 2019

I think the new year is one of the most powerful motivators. Maybe it is the notion of getting through a year – whether it be in celebration or on reflection of tough times. Or maybe it is because the crazy rush eventually dies down, we get to spend some time with our loved ones, […]

I think the new year is one of the most powerful motivators. Maybe it is the notion of getting through a year – whether it be in celebration or on reflection of tough times. Or maybe it is because the crazy rush eventually dies down, we get to spend some time with our loved ones, indulge in all the festivities the festive season has to offer and reflect. Throughout the year we are also afforded times to reflect, maybe not with as many festivities around us.

Reflection is absolutely crucial, without it our experiences are without substance. Without reflection, we often get proverbially “stuck” and may not even be able to move forward or see what we should be celebrating, never-mind what we should be addressing.

For me the following reflections have always played an important role throughout my own life:

  1. How am I doing in achieving my goals? How are we doing as a collective? If I / we are not where we want to be – why? What can I / we do or what should I / we stop doing?
  2. How is my business doing in comparison to last year – what are the reasons for the change or lack thereof?
  3. What do my staff and customers say? How many customers continued supporting us again or are they all new? Did we have a lot of staff turnover? Why?
  4. How much did those closest to me really see / have quality time with me this year?
  5. Am I authentically happy and fulfilled?

For me answering these questions critically, on a regular basis, and reaching out when I cannot seem to move forward has always been an important guiding compass. I have only been able to achieve my goals when I have answered these questions. By asking these questions throughout the year, I have been able to move away from the past and move towards the future.

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Nicolene
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