What I have learnt about building blocks in business

Nov 25, 2019

At this point in time I am going through a massive exercise in simplification. Simplification in the sense that any independent systems are being consolidated, simplified and modified. Also, that processes are being consolidated and the legal structure refined.   Often, we  mistakenly think  that structure is something we do (a legal thing we do) […]

At this point in time I am going through a massive exercise in simplification. Simplification in the sense that any independent systems are being consolidated, simplified and modified. Also, that processes are being consolidated and the legal structure refined.

 

Often, we  mistakenly think  that structure is something we do (a legal thing we do) right at the start or when you expand by  taking on another partner or perhaps following a restructure.   The fact is that the structure should be pliable, not cast in concrete. This means that the legal structure must be setup to make practical and business sense so that it can be responsibly modified as needs be. It also means that systems, processes and protocols should constantly strive to make the work environment more pleasant, work output more efficient and easy to use.

 

It is therefore a journey and not a destination.

 

The trouble is  that most entrepreneurs are so busy chasing deals, that this is often left unattended or if attended, a source of stress.

 

What I have learnt is that support within your structure is key. Support on a horizontal level is not a hierarchy -driven vertical from the owner’s perspective. What I mean is this, empower your support as equals, not glorified subordinates, in the manner in which you work with them. That way, you can start the process of delegation. Don’t be fooled, true delegation to make your organisation sustainable takes a very long time. You will pick the wrong people, you will learn and ultimately you will find what works. They key is just never to give up, no matter what!

 

 

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Nicolene
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