How love really does makes the business world go round

Nov 6, 2019

As much as business is about useful products or services or even, systems and processes, it is more about people. At the end of the day, business is all about relationships. Your ability to build and sustain relationships well is directly correlated to ultimate success. Naturally, the most important relationships to build as a priority are client relationships. It is essential to listen to clients when they are unhappy as much as it is to appreciate praise. Not only does constructive criticism enable us to grow and learn, but it means that the client cared enough to tell you so that you can fix it, and that in itself is excellent!

How love really does makes the business world go round

November 06, 2019

As much as business is about useful products or services or even, systems and processes, it is more about people. At the end of the day, business is all about relationships. Your ability to build and sustain relationships well is directly correlated to ultimate success.
Naturally, the most important relationships to build as a priority are client relationships. It is essential to listen to clients when they are unhappy as much as it is to appreciate praise. Not only does constructive criticism enable us to grow and learn, but it means that the client cared enough to tell you so that you can fix it, and that in itself is excellent!

The other relationship often very trying to maintain our employee relationships. True, it is much easier to maintain a positive relationship with the good performers. The challenge lies in maintaining a positive relationship with the poor performers, the latecomers, the abusers of sick leave and the selfie-obsessed. As much as it is necessary that rules are applied to all equally and therefore, those unacceptable behaviours are dealt with in terms thereof; it is also vital to exercise empathy. Staff retention has become extremely challenging in a world of instant gratification, and for that reason, maintaining healthy relationships is critical.

Stakeholder relationships, too many businesses see themselves as islands, and by doing so, do not collaborate when working with other stakeholders. The engagement often becomes self-centred, which is not conducive to a mutually beneficial working relationship.

The secret to all of this I have learnt is love; all you need is love.

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In South Africa, many businesses are family-owned and operated, with ownership often passing from one generation to the next along the male line. Traditionally, this means that many women support their fathers, brothers, and spouses in the business. Although this sounds familiar or even “as things should be” situation, managing a family business involves navigating complex personal and professional relationships. Be that as it may, family businesses are more than that – they are central to the reality of many families. It is not just another business; it goes to the very core of financial prosperity and home dynamics.

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Nicolene
Share via:

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Business Silver Linings – Post-Election and Down in the Dumps Economy? Possible?

Business Silver Linings – Post-Election and Down in the Dumps Economy? Possible?

In times of economic hardship, businesses face challenges that test their resilience and adaptability. We have just returned from the election polls in South Africa. The uncertainty of the unprecedented outcome has been felt throughout society and in our pockets. While this can be daunting, it also presents invaluable lessons that can strengthen a business’s foundation and prepare it for future uncertainties. It could serve as a valuable opportunity to adjust or even to measure impact and relevance.

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In South Africa, many businesses are family-owned and operated, with ownership often passing from one generation to the next along the male line. Traditionally, this means that many women support their fathers, brothers, and spouses in the business. Although this sounds familiar or even “as things should be” situation, managing a family business involves navigating complex personal and professional relationships. Be that as it may, family businesses are more than that – they are central to the reality of many families. It is not just another business; it goes to the very core of financial prosperity and home dynamics.

It is indeed a complex situation, but let’s add another layer of complexity, one that we rarely hear ventilated until we are in a courtroom. What happens when a woman is the leader instead of a man? Perhaps, let me put it bluntly, it is when a woman employs her husband, partner, father, or brother.

The issues this brings is a shared responsibility to address, it refers to how we raise our children and support our friends and families that find themselves in the grips of this reality. If we get this right, this will not only benefit the women at the helm but also strengthen the family business sector and the family unit as a whole.